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Recovering from Mother Nature's recent outbursts

Nestor formation Friday Oct 18 2019 NOAA_cropped

Nestor, show in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite image above as it gathered steam yesterday (Oct. 18) in the Gulf of Mexico, moved today closer to the Florida panhandle.

The good news is that Nestor is now a post-tropical storm.

That designation change, however, doesn't mean this 14th named storm of the 2019 hurricane season is harmless.

As Nestor moves inland across the southeastern United States, it is projected to bring heavy rains and associated flooding, coastal surges and severe thunderstorms, some with tornadoes.

Meanwhile, in the northeastern part of the county, a large bomb cyclone wreaked havoc.

All this inclement weather means today's Shout Out Saturday goes to my prior postings on recovering from severe weather.

Early severe hurricane damage: Back in late August, Hurricane Dorian's damage prompted my item on Internal Revenue Service and other government resources that can help you deal with a natural disaster.

When a hurricane or any natural catastrophe is declared a major disaster, you may be able to get tax help. You can find details in my post on claiming natural disaster losses

And while we still officially have six weeks of hurricane season left — the countdown clock over in the right column can help you keep track — remember that disasters don't follow man-made calendars

The wide range of natural catastrophes can (and do) happen 365 days a year. And they happen in every part of the county.

So be ready year-round, regardless of where you live, for the mean side of Mother Nature.

Storm_warning_sign

The ol' blog's special Storm Warnings pages can help. This multipage collection of posts offers advice on preparing for, recovering from and helping those who face the many ways that that weather goes wild.

Here's hoping you don't need the storm advice and possible associated tax help, like extended tax deadlines and claiming the itemized tax deduction for damages from a major natural disaster.

But just in case, it's always better to be careful and be prepared. 

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