Weather Feed

Today is officially winter. You know what that means. Taxes. For folks in Michigan, at least. Much of the United States has been in the grips of the Weather Channel named winter storm Decima this month. The Arctic air even dropped down to the Austin area earlier this week, producing a bit of a freeze in our back yard waterfall/stream. (Click image to watch my YouTube video.) OK. Tax collection in the Great Lakes State isn't limited to the coldest months, which are pretty plentiful there. And it's not even limited to one state. Property tax bills, which actually are... Read more →


Really, Mother Nature? I know the Atlantic hurricane season doesn't officially end until Nov. 30, but really? Radar image courtesy National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Hurricane Center Tropical Depression 16 formed early this morning (Monday, Nov. 21) in the southwest section of the Caribbean Sea. By midday, it had intensified enough to be named Tropical Storm Otto. No U.S. threat: The good news for the United States and Caribbean islands is that Otto is due east of Nicaragua and is expected to track west over the next few days. The bad news for Nicaragua and residents of Honduras, Costa Rica,... Read more →


With the Oct. 17 filing extension colliding with Hurricane Matthew's aftermath, the Internal Revenue Service today announced additional counties in which taxpayers affected by the storm will have more time to file. Federal Emergency Management Agency Urban Search and Rescue team members rescue a dog stranded by Hurricane Matthew flooding in North Carolina. (Photo courtesy FEMA) The IRS has officially added parts of Florida, Georgia and South Carolina to the Hurricane Matthew areas that will get additional tax relief. It also included more counties in North Carolina counties, which it had previously announced as eligible for special storm-related tax relief.... Read more →


If earlier this year you asked the Internal Revenue Service for an extension to file your 2015 tax return, you're running out of time. That deadline is next Monday, Oct. 17. Unless you live in parts of Florida, Louisiana, North Carolina or West Virginia. UPDATE: Or in other areas of Florida and North Carolina, as well as South Carolina and Georgia. The IRS on Oct. 17 announced tax relief for these added Hurricane Matthew disaster areas. North Carolina, which has been hard hit by flooding from Hurricane Matthew rains, is the latest state where taxpayers are getting special consideration when... Read more →


Sorry, not sorry, to yell at you in my headline, but Hurricane Matthew is going to get awfully close to expected to hit Florida's east coast -- in fact, very near where the hubby and I lived for six years -- in the next few days, so time is short to get ready for him. National Hurricane Center's 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 5, update of Hurricane Matthew's projected path, aka the cone of uncertainty, or as we called in when we lived in South Florida, the cone of panic. I know I blogged about this storm earlier this week, which... Read more →


This post has been updated throughout with weather and news updates. The good news is that Hurricane Matthew, which was a category 5, has weakened a bit. The bad news is that it's still a very dangerous and destructive storm. GOES radar 4:15 a.m. Central Time, Oct. 4, via National Hurricane Center/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Click image for animated view. Caribbean, and more, threat: Haiti is now feeling Matthew's force. The storm is expected to make landfall on that Caribbean island later this morning. Nearly a foot of rain is expected in parts of western Haiti, Jamaica and eastern... Read more →


A workplace retirement plan, where, in most cases, employees automatically put in some pre-tax money each pay period, is the largest -- or only -- savings many folks have. Louisiana flood victims can now access their retirement money more easily to help with their recovery efforts in flooded areas, like Port Vincent shown in this National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) photo. Click the image to see more NOAA aerial before-and-after shots of Louisiana flood areas. And as the name indicates, retirement plans are for your post-work years. Sometimes, though, you need that money before you leave the workforce. In... Read more →


This post has been updated to reflect the developments of late-August tropical systems. We enjoyed many good years in South Florida, but this time of year, I'm glad we moved back to Texas. Central, not coastal, Texas. Clean-up is underway in Zachary, Louisiana, after flooding earlier this month, but more rains from a system that could grow into a tropical storm could be headed toward the Gulf Coast. (Photo courtesy Federal Emergency Management Agency/FEMA) The Atlantic hurricane season officially begins June 1, but mid-August to mid-September is the peak storm period. This year looks to be on the usual track.... Read more →


Almost 7 trillion gallons of rain in just one week across Louisiana produced the worst U.S. natural disaster since Hurricane Sandy in 2012. A Mississippi Army National Guard CH-47 Chinook helicopter delivers sandbags to the levee near the Elayn Hunt Correctional Facility in St. Gabriel, Louisiana, on Aug. 16, 2016. Click image to view the video and learn more about Mississippi's aide to its neighbor. "This disaster is the worst to hit the United States since Superstorm Sandy, and we anticipate it will cost at least $30 million -- a number which may grow as we learn more about the... Read more →


Torrential rains have produced deadly flooding across central Louisiana. In response to the historic downpours, the Internal Revenue Service today announced that storm victims will have until Jan. 17, 2017, to file certain individual and business tax returns and make certain tax payments. Folks who are affiliated with recognized government or philanthropic organizations and helping in the Louisiana relief effort also qualify for the special IRS tax treatment. Official disaster areas: The IRS move comes after President Barack Obama declared rain-soaked parts of the Pelican State major disaster areas. These include East Baton Rouge, Livingston, St. Helena and Tangipahoa parishes.... Read more →


One thing you can say for California is that its impressive diversity also extends to disasters. San Francisco houses built on loose ground sustain damage in the massive 1906 earthquake. Compared to other damage from the 7.8 magnitude temblor, this was minor. (Photo courtesy National Archives) The only good thing about such widespread destruction is that affected residents might be able to claim some disaster losses on their taxes. And in a recent decision, the Internal Revenue Service has offered some additional tax relief for Californians who got private relief in connection with an historic natural gas leak. Earthquakes, fires... Read more →


Mother Nature got a jump on the 2016 storm calendar, creating Hurricane Alex back in January and Tropical Storm Bonnie four days before today's official start of the Atlantic hurricane season. Seasonal forecast for the Atlantic Hurricane Season from Colorado State University (CSU), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and The Weather Channel. The forecast from CSU includes Hurricane Alex and Tropical Storm Bonnie. The Weather Channel and the NOAA forecasts include Hurricane Alex. Does that mean we'll have more storms this year than the dozen or so that are predicted? Maybe. Maybe not. Weather prognostications from a variety... Read more →


The unofficial start of summer 2016 is decidedly soggy. Click image for ideas on how to deal with a rainy day in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Here in Texas, we're still dealing with literally flooding rains. Tragically, the excessive precipitation has been deadly. Meanwhile, the Carolinas are coping with the second storm of the 2016 Atlantic Hurricane season. Y'all remember the unusual subtropical Alex, which hit The Azores, a group of islands about 900 miles west of Portugal, on Jan. 15. That gave the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season a rare January start. Unwelcome holiday weekend guest: Bonnie is keeping the... Read more →


My thoughts and prayers go out to Oklahomans who today are literally digging out from the deadly May 9 tornado outbreak that savaged their state. This photo by University of Oklahoma meteorologist JR Hehnly, shared on his @stormchasing Twitter feed, freaks me out. It's not just the massive twister outside Wynnewood, Oklahoma, the afternoon of May 9. It's also the line of cars there at the bottom right speeding away from the danger. What must be going through those folks' minds? I am grateful that the friends I have north of the Red River border are safe. But sadly, such... Read more →


Hey, May. You're supposed to be all about the flowers from last month's April showers. You can stop the rain and more any time now. Bluebonnets and more in a Central Texas field along the Willow City Loop. Photo by Kay Bell; art direction by the hubby. Yep, that old climatological adage is not quite accurate. May also brings plenty of showers. And hail. And tornadoes. That trend seems to be on track this year. Just two days into the month, and severe weather has moved from Central and flooded East Texas, where Houston was declared a major disaster area,... Read more →


It's official. Much of greater Houston that flooded last week is now a presidentially declared disaster area. Austin didn't sustain the kind of damage from mid-April rains that Houston, about 170 miles southeast, did. But we got enough to fill Lake Travis to the brim, necessitating the opening of a Mansfield Dam floodgate. My video of the released lake water is posted on YouTube. That means that the Internal Revenue Service, which already told taxpayers in H Town not to worry about making the April 18 filing deadline, is providing additional special tax relief for affected individuals and businesses in... Read more →


Timing is everything. Just ask all the Texans coping with the aftermath of recent spring storms and the unfortunate timing of the state's first storm-related tax holiday. Hail and its damage in Wylie, Texas, earlier in April. (Photos by Mary Ann Olson, left, and Wes Stephens, right, via The Weather Channel) On April 11, the Dallas-Ft. Worth areas was pummeled by storms, some of which produced softball size hail. Law enforcement agencies, media outlets and insurance companies were inundated with reports of shattered car windshields, broken windows in buildings and even holes in roofs. The next night, hailstones larger than... Read more →


While millions of Americans on Monday, April 18, were worrying about getting their taxes to Uncle Sam on time, folks in Houston had bigger problems. Tax Day 2016 coincided with deadly flooding in Texas' largest city. Rescuers head out in boats, rafts to help motorists stranded on flooded Houston streets. Click image to watch CBSN video. The Internal Revenue Service on April 18 announced that taxpayers affected by the severe weather in the Houston area, as well as in other hard-hit parts of Texas, may qualify for relief from the usual late-filing penalties. Penalty relief for flooded late filers: If... Read more →


Today is the first day of winter and it's supposed to hit 76 it hit 79 degrees here in Austin. Similar temperatures are forecast for the rest of this Christmas week. I thought we left such winter warmth behind us 10 years ago when we moved from South Florida back home to Texas. And for most winters over the last decade, we've had our share of the cold, like in 2011 and 2013 when we had snow and temperatures low enough to freeze our backyard fountain. Some winters in Austin, Texas, like this one in 2011 have been cold. But... Read more →


Mother Nature is drunk or in a particularly bad mood or can't read a calendar. Whatever, yesterday's outbreak of tornadoes in the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles, as well as into Kansas and Nebraska, was extremely rare. Some weather folk are characterizing it as historic. Click image to watch Pecos Hank's video of the massive Pampa, Texas, wedge tornado on 11-16-15 via AccuWeather. Joking, sorta, aside, I have to quote the weather professionals here. "Tornadoes can happen any time of year," notes Dr. Harold Brooks of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Severe Storms Laboratory. "It looks like the... Read more →